Your Beauty Bar Compared To A Natural Soap

natural soap bar

I am a label reading gal. If you followed me around a store, you would find me reading the labels of various food products before I place them in my cart. However, reading the labels of cleaners and soaps wasn’t typically something I would do. That’s to say I didn’t until one day I decided to pause and look closer – that was the day I converted to natural soap. Just like the ingredients on heavily processed foods, I found many ingredients I didn’t understand let alone be able to pronounce. It made me question what am I actually using?

Looking solely at the labels also shows an interesting missing descriptor – the word soap isn’t there. Most “soaps” you can buy at your box stores are called beauty bars, cleansing bars, or bars. Manufacturers cannot legally call their product soap because it isn’t a soap.  The next time you pick up a bar check it out and see what label you find.

Ingredients

Here we will examine two common cleaning bars. On the left is Ivory which presents claims of being 99.44% clean and simple on its label. The second bar is Irish Spring which presents itself as a “Deodorant Soap with Antibacterial Protection”. It’s important to note that many of the ingredients listed would not be acceptable to a vegan lifestyle.

Bar of Ivory Bar of Irish Spring
  1. Sodium Tallowate: Tallow comes from the fatty tissue of cows or sheep.  Sodium Tallowate are salts from the fatty acids of tallow.
  2. Sodium Palmate: This is a fatty acid derived from Palm Oil mixed with sodium hydroxide or lye. This process is called saponification.
  3. Water: good old fashioned H2O!
  4. Sodium Cocoate: This is a fatty acid derived from Coconut Oil mixed with sodium hydroxide or lye. This process is called saponification.
  5. Sodium Palm Kernelate: This is a salt of palm oil and works as a skin conditioner.
  6. Glycerin: This is a byproduct of soap making. It comes from sugar alcohols that are available from animal or vegetable oils.
  7. Sodium Chloride: This is common salt or table salt.
  8. Fragrance: The FDA states companies don’t need to disclose what the fragrance is made from since it is considered a “trade secret”. These are chemical additives to provide synthetic aroma.
  9. Coconut Acid or Palm Kernel Acid, or Tallow Acid or Palm Acid: One of these added extra fats from coconut, palm kernel, tallow or palm to complete the lye transformation into soap.
  10. Tetrasodium EDTA: Allows cleansers to soften the water which washes the dirt away.  According to the National Institute of Health these agents have a toxic impact on cells and are potentially destructive to genetic material.
  1. Sodium Tallowate: Sodium Tallowate are salts from the fatty acids of tallow.
  2. Water: good old fashioned H2O!
  3. Sodium Cocoate or Sodium Palm: Fatty acid from Coconut Oil mixed with sodium hydroxide or lye.
  4. Triclocarban: an antibacterial agent typically added to hand sanitizers and cleaners. The FDA is advising against use of this chemical due to the rise in more resistant strains of bacteria.
  5. Stearic Acid: a waxy acid found in animal and vegetable fats.
  6. Coconut or Palm Kernelate: This is a salt of palm oil and works as a skin conditioner.
  7. Coconut and/or Palm Kernel ACD: used to produce fatty acids and aids in lathering.
  8. Glycerin: byproduct of soap making. It comes from sugar alcohols that are available from animal or vegetable oils.
  9. Sodium Chloride: this is common salt or table salt.
  10. Fragrance: chemical additive to provide synthetic aroma.
  11. PEG-12: a synthetic polymer designed to give whatever it is added to a smooth feel.
  12. Polysorbate 20: a detergent. Some consumers have cited concerns related to the chemical becoming contaminated with 1,4-dioxane as a part of it’s manufacturing process. That contamination may be cancerous if it occurs.
  13. Tetrasodium EDTA: Allows cleansers to soften the water which washes the dirt away.  According to the National Institute of Health these agents have a toxic impact on cells and are potentially destructive to genetic material.
  14. Titanium Dioxide: used for coloring.
  15. BHT D&C Green # 8: artificial coloring agent.
  16. FD&C Green # 3: artificial coloring agent.

As you can see, the list of ingredients can vary dramatically from one bar to the next. Natural soap; however, is made up of fats and oils that combine with an alkali to produce a chemical reaction that results in soap.

According to the FDA there are few “true” soaps in the marketplace. Most body cleansers, both liquid and solid, are synthetic detergents. For more information on what constitutes a true or natural soap, click here.

awildbarsoapTake A Walk On The Wild Side With Their Natural Soap!

We use a natural organic soap made by A Wild Soap Bar in our home.  The whole family loves the Honey Oat because it is fragrance free.  The best part about using these natural soaps is that my hands feel squeaky clean.  This squeaky clean phrase probably dates back to when everyone used soap and not these harsh hand cleansers and detergent bars we use today.  The lather is luxurious.  Our skin felt noticeably softer, reducing our reliance on lotions to moisturize.

The ingredients in their natural soap weren’t anything to fear either:

  • Premium saponified* organic vegetable oils- including extra virgin olive, coconut, palm, sunflower, and castor
  • Distilled Water
  • Raw Honey
  • Organic Oat Flour
  • Goats Milk

*saponified means to turn a fat into a soap using an alkali

What’s Best for You Might Be A Natural Soap.

Natural soap may cost more than the other cleansers you can buy from your box stores.  However, a natural soap will typically last longer and you might not need to lather on lotion to replenish moisture lost, so the cost difference can even out. Plus, if you are looking at removing toxins from your house, natural soap may be a safe way to accomplish this.

Another nice thing about natural soap is it is a great way to support American artisans that take pride in making a fine product.  It’s American Pride at its finest.

This natural soap article was not sponsored by A Wild Soap Bar – We just really like the products they produce.

2017-02-23T13:58:19+00:00

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